Tips · Uncategorized

One of My Favorites

Bass fisherman have many “favorite” lures. They change from season to season and year to year, but this lure really is towards the top of my list. The Strike King Fat Baby Finesse Worm is my go-to worm for fishing ponds and busy lakes. It is almost too easy to use and catch fish on. In fact, I caught a bass today on this lure.  I love having a pond in the backyard!

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There are many different ways to rig this worm, but I stick to three main techniques. I use this worm Texas rigged, on a shakey head, and wacky style.

I like to use this worm Texas rigged when fishing near vegetation and stumps.  This style of fishing allows you to fish any structure in the water without getting snagged. I use a 1/0 or 2/0  Owner Twistlock light worm hook.

I will use this worm is on a shakey head or football head too. This technique is great for fishing deep water. The worm will stand almost straight up on this style of jig head.  I like to use a 1/8 ounce or 1/4 ounce shakey head most of the time.

Wacky style is the technique I prefer most of the time. I like to use a small wide gap hook through the middle of the worm and let it fall very slowly. This style works very well when you know there is no structure to get hung up on. The exposed hook allows for easy fish hook ups, but also allows the lure to get snagged easily.  One trick I like to use is put a very small split shot weight about 8 inches above the hook. This allows the worm to fall just slightly faster.

The Strike King Fat Baby Finesse Worm is also injected with coffee scent and salt. The bass seem to like coffee as much as my wife does.

 

 

 

Fishing Trips

Slow Night

Not all outings are successful. I fished the Ohio River for an hour and only caught one sauger on a square bill crankbait. I wasn’t expecting to catch a sauger. Hopefully, I can go back and fish for walleye/sauger in that spot and catch some more.

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I fished about as much cover as possible in an hour and never figured out where the bass were located. There was very little boat traffic on the river tonight, which made for a beautiful evening. I only saw one other fishing boat, maybe others knew the fish weren’t biting.

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These are the kinds of evenings that you love to be on the water. It is also the reason why they call it fishing and not catching.

Tips

Favorite Crappie Lures

I love to bass fish, but catching crappies is a very close second. There are three things that I really enjoy about crappie fishing; First, the techniques for catching them is almost identical to bass fishing, second, you can catch a lot more of them, and last, they are great to eat.

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Anyone who has fished with me knows that I am not a very patient fisherman. I like lures that I can fish fast, and cover a lot of water. Once I locate a school of crappies, then I will slow down long enough to thoroughly work the area. Here are some of my favorite crappie lures.

The Strike King Shad Pole is a fairly new crappie lure on the market. The little ball on the tail moves at every little twitch of the rod. It’s a great minnow imitator.

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The Charlie Brewer’s Crappie Slider Grub is another great lure. The paddle tail of this lure gives off a ton of vibration. It looks just like a minnow swimming through the water.

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Hair Jigs are great at catching all kinds of fish. I like to use them two different ways. One way is with a bobber and continually jigging it back to the boat. The other way is letting it sink slowly while twitching the rod tip. The hairs on the bait give off a lot of subtle action that fish can’t refuse.  Check out my post about how to make homemade hair jigs here.

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Tube Jigs have been around for as long as I know, but they are hard to beat for catching crappies. These little lures work with a very light jig head and are probably my all time favorite crappie lures.

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Fishing Trips

Kincaid Lake

Fishing a new body of water is one of my favorite things to do. I really enjoy trying to figure out how, and where to catch fish on a new lake. I spent a couple of hours on Kincaid Lake on Saturday. Kincaid Lake is located in Falmouth, Kentucky.

Saturday was a beautiful day in Northern Kentucky. The wind was calm, which made the water look like glass. This isn’t ideal for fishing, but it sure looks pretty. The lake has a natural shoreline which makes it very scenic as well.

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Whenever I arrive at a new lake, I like to see what kind of structure it offers. I quickly realized Kincaid offers a lot of visible shoreline cover. Rocks, boulders, fallen trees, stumps, and grass are all very prominent. I also noticed, because it was so calm, that there where hundreds of small bluegill in the shallow areas. Both of these things indicated to me to fish shallow and cover a lot of water.

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I started out my day using a buzzbait. The bass liked my lure of choice. I quickly started catching keeper bass. I never caught any giant bass, but my five biggest weighed about 10 pounds total.

I was happy with what I caught during a short outing on Saturday. I have a hunch that Kincaid may to turn into a favorite crappie lake of mine, too. I will have to make another trip there soon.

 

Recipes

Fried Crappie Recipe

Who doesn’t love fried fish? Especially when you caught them yourself. Crappies are one of my favorite fish to eat. We caught these crappies from Lake Shafer in August.

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We decided to cook these up for dinner one night. The seasoning I chose to use was Open Season, but I really like Uncle Bucks available at Bass Pro Shops. I like to mix together their original seasoning with their spicy flavor. I also add bread crumbs for a little extra crunch.

I use paper plates, because it makes clean up much easier. The only dishes I have to use are the bowl for the egg wash and the skillet.

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Pat at the crappie fillets completely dry. Once dry drop them into the egg wash.

After they have been soaked in the egg mix coat them with the breading mix. Don’t be afraid to make the breading is thick.

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I like to cook the fish outside on the grill gas burner. This keeps the fried fish smell outside. You also don’t have to worry about the fish splattering. Put enough oil in the skillet to cover at least half of the fish. Cook the side down until it turns golden brown. Flip the fillet over and cook the other side to golden brown. The fish will come out crunchy and ready to eat.

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I almost like eating them as much as I like catching them. Okay, not really, but they sure are tasty!

 

Tips

What a Fluke

Fluke fishing is a great way to catch bass in shallow or clear water.  A Fluke is a soft plastic lure that can be rigged a variety of ways, but  is normally rigged weedless and fished near the surface.

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I have fished with Flukes for many years. They can be fished fast by twitching it across the water’s surface. This presentation results in some impressive strikes. Flukes can also be fished very slowly by allowing it to sink to the bottom. Once the Fluke hits the bottom, twitch it up a few feet and allow it to fall back down.

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As with any lure, you must experiment with the presentation the bass want on that day. One day the fish may want the lure worked fast and erratic, while the next day you won’t get a bite working it fast. When this happens slow down, and work the Fluke without any action. Bass can be very picky on how they want a Fluke worked.

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I like to use a weightless fluke, but you can add a bullet weight to the front of the Fluke. Another way to weight a Fluke is to buy a weighted hook. This style of hook is great when you are fishing deep water and need the bait to sink faster.

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The Fluke has been around for years, but still catches fish. This is a lure that is often over looked, but any good bass fisherman has a Fluke somewhere in their tackle box.

Tips

Homemade Hair Jigs

There is nothing like catching a fish on a homemade lure. Taking hair from a deer tail and making it look appetizing for a fish is pretty cool.

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My family has been tying crappie and white bass jigs for many years. My dad and uncle are really good at it, but I like to tie a few myself when I run low on a certain color. The fish really don’t care if the jigs look perfect.

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The nice thing about hair jigs is they catch all species of fish. I have caught fish on very small 1/32 ounce hair jigs to 1/2 ounce hair jigs. Big hair jigs have become very popular on the bass fishing scene recently. Crappie fisherman have been utilizing this great lure for years.

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If you want to tie your own hair jigs here are few items that you will need:

  1. Lead, molds, and hooks to make the jig heads.
  2. Paint or nail polish for to paint the heads
  3. Deer tail hair
  4. Thread
  5. Jig vise

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I  fished  Lake Shafer today and I caught 6 different species of fish on my hand tied hair jigs. If you want one lure that can catch any fish in the lake, then a hair jig would be my choice. They also catch big fish too.